Featured post

My Blog

This is my blog which will allow me to share my thoughts on fonts, software techniques and other aspects of the design process.

For the past two years I have been viewing font sites and in particular Dafont and MyFonts for typeface recognition and a basic understanding of the role fonts play in molding a design’s
identity.

My posts will mainly be about font classifications in the form of my favorite fonts for a selected style or theme. My hope is that you, the viewer will find a font that you have never seen before and maybe this font will serve as “missing puzzle piece” to your design solution.

Google Font Families

Recently Google added a new and improved site for their font directory and the newer interface is certainly an improvement over the older one. What I was most excited to see were the addition of several new font families. After downloading these I decided to create a visual directory of the newly added fonts and Google’s existing ones which I chose as my favorites.

I’m hoping that I can establish a weekly blog and write about selected font families that fall under certain font styles such as slab serif, sans serif, headline and decorative/unique.

For my first post under this premise I’d like to show some of Google’s Slab Serif font families that I selected based on personal preference. I hope you’ll see some fonts that you didn’t know existed under the Google umbrella.

Slab_Serif_Families

Wait! Don’t Pay for that Font!

With the proliferation of Google Fonts and other online resources such as Font Squirrel, designer and, writers are being offered a smorgasbord of free fonts to choose from these days. As a glorious by-product of this free font offering, many of these fonts are either identical to or very closely resemble fonts for purchase. Out of respect for the font foundries that are making a living selling their beautiful fonts, I am not going to name any fonts for purchase. What I am going to do is provide some examples of amazing free fonts. Some of these fonts don’t have a purchased doppelganger but others offered here are close matches to fonts that could run as much as $100 for purchase. I hope this short list provides an insightful glimpse into the varieties of free fonts that exist.

FontSquirrel_Google

Google font combinations for print and web design

Google fonts are plentiful. Google fonts are diverse and best of all, Google fonts are free! Before a collaboration between designer and client gets going, most clients I have worked with want to know more about which fonts are free and which fonts come with a price tag. I have taken the time to browse through all of the current Google fonts available (632) and compile a small infographic showing my favorite Google fonts and how they could be used together in print and web materials. All of the combinations are open to mixing and matching various combinations and if I used a sans serif headline font I tended to go with a serif body font and vice-versa. I chose these fonts because I believed these not only were aesthetically pleasing but tended to be great fonts for the web with their strong, evenly weighted stem and spines that characterize good browser legibility. I hope my list will assist you in your search for that perfect Google font and speed up your print and web design time.

Google_Font_Combos3

Similar Fonts

So what do you do when a client says “It looks like this font, can you find another font like it?” or you know that the right look is just not there but oh so close? Most designers turn to the many font sites and foundries that are out there on the web. But what then? Do you type in, “Find me all the fonts that look like Bodoni Poster?” There are a few solutions to this dilemma. You can conduct a specialized search like entering in a descriptive phrase such as “Spooky fonts” in Google Images for a certain look that defines the style of the font you’re searching for or you can go to MyFonts. This site offers a service titled, “Submit an image” where the searcher submits an image of a similar font from a screen capture or another imaging method and submits it to the site’s search feature. First you are given a list of compatible fonts and if you’re not quite satisfied with that solution you can proceed a little further to the site’s panel of font experts. You can specify if you want a reply sent to your email address or just watch your inquiry appear in the WhatTheFont forum and wait for a response with a matching solution. I have compiled a small list of similar fonts based on my extensive searches that I hope will illustrate the array of font similarities that exist and will continue to grow as more fonts are created and submitted to the web.Similar_Fonts

Pixel Fonts

So many font categories, so many options when determining what type of font to use in a design. Pixel fonts are generally seen as futuristic but with so many options these days, the
diverse range of styles doesn’t necessarily define a futuristic-looking message or concept. A quick search through pixel font categories in dafont will reveal styles that reflect vectorized
traditional fonts and provide a unique option that can serve as a nice alternative to a “normal” smooth-edged font. Here is a short list of pixel fonts that have caught my eye and could make for a unique and visually attractive font option.

Pixel_FontsBM Utopia, Pix Roma, Émigré 15 (Lo-res 22 serif), Unlearned Bitmap, SugarBoy, Marietta Five, M38 Gorilla, Pixel Cowboy, Extrude Regular, Nemoddak 12 Regular,
PKMN Pinball, Origami Mommy, BM Corrode A13, Cube Bitmap 12, Oakland 8,
Borgnine, BM Germar A12

Heavy Fonts

Sometimes the design really pops with a massively huge font. Sometimes a heavy font is the backdrop for a thin, elegant font creating a double font effect that is eye catching. Whenever a heavy font is used an important message is proclaimed. Here are my favorite fonts that are visually appealing and serve the function of getting an important message across.

Heavy_FontsGiza Nine Five, Force Regular, Pincoya Black, Angies New House, Blox Regular,
Val Regular, Mobile Infantry, Mod Regular, Party Hard, DM Yes, Beautiful,
Gran Canaries, Clutchee, Dan Bold, Neil Bold, Null Free, Keel Fat, Tauro Regular

Attractive Question Mark Fonts

This post goes nicely with my post regarding ampersand fonts. I never really look at the question mark associated with a font. I will usually catch a post on dafont or MyFonts as a subscriber is asking for help to identify a question mark and checking out the reply from the administrator or a contributor. There are probably a ton of better examples out there but I think this list will help assist anyone looking for a nice question mark to add some spice to a graphic.

Question_MarksA&S Rister, Villa Didot, Sophisticate Ultra SSK, Ziggy ITC, Sphinx Inline, Fantini,
Elephant Bells Heavy, Fenwick Olden, Rio Grande wbw, Gille Classic, Bodoni Poster,
Magnifico Daytime, Rye Regular

Christmas Fonts

There were plenty of fonts to chose from when I was searching my files for type faces that looked like festive holiday fonts. I decided on these 13 fonts and I hope they provide you with an inspirational font to use for your Christmas card or holiday decorations.

Christmas2

Ham and Eggs, Minnesota Winter, Mecheria Regular, Good Vibrations, Patchanka, Greymantle, Fruktur Regular, Confection, Castlebury Sans Swash, CAC Shishoni Brush, Grenouille, Lavanderia , Mountains of Christmas

My Favorite Typewriter Fonts

Typewriter fonts  can be used for a wide variety of projects. Poster headlines, book titles, T-shirt art and pretty much anything that you would want to look scary or grungy. There are so many typewriter fonts out there that the popular Dafont website has 160 varieties. Here are 14 of my favorite typewriter fonts.

TypewriterHollywood Starfire, Savanne, Lucznik 1303, Signs-Zeichen 2.0, Veteran Typewriter, Just Another Courier, TypeWrong Smudged Bold, Adler, Bohemian Typewriter, Onyourbike, Harting, Mom’s Typewriter, VT Corona, Trixie Plain

Antique Handwriting Fonts

Antique fonts add character to any form of print or electronic piece. Whether these fonts were scanned in from old letters or documents handwritten antique fonts should be a part of any
designer’s font arsenal. Here are a few of my favorites that you may recognize and maybe some are new to your hunt for unique fonts.

Antique Jane Austen, Dead Mans Hand, Voluta Script, Diesel Rudolph, National Archive, Byron Regular, P22 Cezanne, Roanoke Script, P22 Grosvenor, AL Savannah, American Scribe, Lassigue DMato, CK Heritage, Whitechapel BB